Is Blinking keeps your Eyes Clean and Clear

ImageBlinking is a crucial part of keeping the right amount of moisture in the eye surface, especially during cold, dry weather. It coats the eye with a fresh layer of tears while also cleaning the surface and moisturizing it. It is an almost subconscious action that means a lot to a dry eye patient.

Whether you work at a computer for +8hrs, watch a movie, or live in a dry environment, a slow blinking rate will increase your dry eye symptoms. Under normal circumstances, your blinking rate is an average 4 seconds, about 15 times a minute. When using the computer or staring at any other bright screen our blinking rate decreases by up to a whopping 70%!

Blink break! Before you continue reading… blink a couple of times.
Will blinking alone help my dry eyes during the day?

Continue Reading:

Advertisements

Doctors Use 3-D Printing To Help A Baby Breathe

Image

Ever since the day Garrett Peterson was born, his parents have had to watch him suddenly just stop breathing.

“He could go from being totally fine to turning blue sometimes — not even kidding — in 30 seconds,” says Garrett’s mother, Natalie Peterson, 25, of Layton, Utah. “It was so fast. It was really scary.”

Garrett was born with a defective windpipe. His condition, known as tracheomalacia, left his trachea so weak the littlest thing makes it collapse, cutting off his ability to breathe.

“When he got upset, or even sometimes just with a diaper change, he would turn completely blue,” his mother says, “and that was terrifying.”So the Petersons contacted Dr. Glenn Green

He teamed up with Scott Hollister, a biomedical engineer who runs the university’s 3-D Printing Lab, to create a remarkable solution to Garrett’s problem — a device that will hold open Garrett’s windpipe until it’s strong enough to work on its own.

Continue Reading: 

 

Mom of Newborn Twins Fights Rare Placenta Cancer

mom cancer

Jenna Hinman is fighting for her life in a medically-induced coma after she gave birth to healthy twins at 30 weeks pregnancy, only to discover she had a rare cancer of the placenta that has filled her lungs with tumors.

The 26-year-old mother is in “critical but stable” condition at Crouse Hospital in Syracuse, N.Y. The twin baby girls, Kinleigh and Azlynn are doing fine at 2 pounds, 9 ounces, and 3 pounds, 6 ounces, respectively.

The twins are doing well and don’t have breathing tubes anymore,” said Hinman, 30, who is stationed at Fort Drum. “Both are feeding and right where they need to be at 30 weeks.”

Crouse Hospital spokesman Bob Allen said her treatment was “a highly rare situation here, not just because of the pregnancy-related cancer, which is a big piece of it, but the fact that she is on ECMO technology.”

Read More:

Birth control pills — effectiveness, side-effects and health risks

contraceptive-pills

Every day, over 100 million women all over the world pop an emergency oral contraceptive pill. Oral contraceptive pills are no doubt an effective way to birth control in sexually active married women. But, such widespread use of birth control pills is definitely alarming because most women using them are unaware about its mechanism of action and its safety aspect. In this article, we highlight important aspects about birth control pills that every woman should know.

How does a birth 

control pill work?

When should you take the pill?

What are the side-effects?

 

Read  More

Mobile phone injury – man survives high voltage shock and undergone 8 surgeries

Image

Ravi (name changed), a 23-years-old MBA graduate, shifted to his new residence in Gwalior, Madhya Pradesh. It was late evening when he received a phone call on his mobile. While talking on mobile, he walked to the rooftop and stood near the parapet. It was dark outside and little did he know that there were high-tension wires passing near the roof 

Suddenly, the magnetic field surrounding the mobile got mixed with the electrical field of the high-tension wires. In a fraction of second, 11,000 volts of high voltage current entered Ravi’s body through the mobile into his ears and exited into the earth through the groin area

Read More:

‘Penicillin Girl’ Genean Hixon dies at 82

Image

A woman whose breakthrough treatment with penicillin during World War II led to modern medical practices died March 1, two days before her 83rd birthday.

Genean Hixon, better known in the 1940s as the “Penicillin Girl,” was at the age of 12 one of the first American civilians to be treated with what The Denver Post called the “mysterious miracle drug” in a series of articles on her progress.

Hixon, born Genean Smith on March 3, 1931, was hospitalized on July 24, 1943, with severe osteomyelitis — a bone disease that at the time was seemingly incurable and potentially fatal.

Hixon’s daughter, Connie Hixon Davis, said her mother spent more than four years in hospital beds in her teens, but was saved early on by the penicillin treatment.

“Interestingly, she developed an allergy to penicillin and couldn’t take it in her later years,” Connie said.

Hixon was diagnosed with liver cancer in December, which led to her death. She is survived by a large family including her husband Donald, 87, a brother Gerald Smith, 79, four children, 11 grandchildren and 11 great-grandchildren.

Throughout her life, Genean remained as avid a reader and seamstress as when she was cooped up in Denver General hospital as a young woman.

Read More:

Toddler’s FaceTime Saves Mom After Dog Bite

140309_gma_haines_0718_wg

While toddlers using tablets and smartphones may be too much for some, 2-year-old Bentley Toone’s FaceTime expertise turned him into his mother’s hero.

The boy’s mother, Laura Toone, had taken a walk when a foster dog she was caring for attacked one of her dogs. She tried breaking up the fight but the dog nearly bit one of her fingers off.

“I begged my daughters to call 911 and they’re four and they were quite afraid to even touch the phone because it was covered in my own blood,” she said Friday from her home in Tucson, Ariz.

Toone continued to lose blood and felt like she’d pass out soon. But Bentley saved the day.

“Here comes my son from the kitchen bringing me our dish towel,” she said. “He wiped off the blood himself and proceeded to call my friend on FaceTime.”

Read More: